Category Archives: Fighting Poverty

A Complex Land Made Simple Through Compassion

IMG_6086ER Director of Women’s Advocacy Kelly McClelland just returned from a trip to the Philippines to visit our ER Asia staff, including Regional Director Joshua Benevidez and his wife Anne. Kelly shares some of the impact she experienced.

By Kelly McClelland

Last week, I spent a day with several women living in deep poverty. For these gals, every day is a struggle to obtain food, decent shelter and necessities that we take for granted. I would feel hopeless if I was in their situation, but these women were full of joy.

IMG_6078Let me explain a little about Golden Hands Sewing. This group is the result of the vision, compassion and hard work of our ER Asia staff. Golden Hands was created in order to help women escape abject poverty.

I spent 13 hours with the women, providing teaching, encouragement and a listening ear. We invited them to a luncheon at a local mall and it was evident many had not been to a mall or IMG_6057a restaurant. Looking at the menus generated both confusion and shyness. All the ladies ate half their meals and saved the other half to take home. It was humbling to see them react in such a gracious manner.

Throughout the day, the women worked on making skirts. They were like busy bees, cutting patterns, sewing and humming songs that lifted my heart. Even though they have nothing, they have IMG_6005everything. I was undone by their joyful spirits.

The previous night, I had dinner with Joshua and Anne. We experienced a beautiful sunset against the ocean. As dinner progressed, Joshua and Anne shared their love story of pain, sacrifice and rejection as they entered into full-time service to the poor.

IMG_5974As I reflected on their journey, my mind revisited scenes from earlier in the day. Anne and I had passed a man washing his clothes in a little plastic bowl. It appeared he was living next to a parked new car. The contrast was stark.

I also noticed a teenager sleeping on the sidewalk in broad daylight. It’s very possible he has been living on the sidewalk since he was a little boy. My heart sank as I thought about his life. IMG_5975In the Philippines, street children are rampant because of extreme poverty.

But my spirit was quickly buoyed with gratitude for Joshua and Anne because of their tender hearts for people living in desperate conditions. Like the rest of the ER Asia staff and our partners, they are committed to helping rescue street kids and adults, as well as people living in squatter communities.

FullSizeRenderTo those of you who have supported the work of ER’s Extreme Women, thank you so much for your investment into the lives of people who need our compassion and help. Golden Hands is one example of how we are changing lives by working together. We have many other initiatives, partners and short-term team opportunities taking place around the world. We’d love to have you join us.

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KellyFor additional information on Extreme Women and how you can get involved, please contact Kelly McClelland at a kmcclelland@extremeresponse.org or visit http://www.extremeresponse.org/our-programs/womens-advocacy.

Helping Dump Families Thrive One Home at a Time

During heavy rainstorms, the family's previous home would leak terribly.
During heavy rainstorms, the family’s previous home would leak terribly.

By Tim Fausch, ER Communications Director

“We used to pray to God that he wouldn’t send the rain because we had a dirt floor. Rain was our biggest fear.”

It’s bad enough being dirt poor, but when even the dirt turns against you, you’ve reached the bottom. That was the situation that confronted one family in Quito, Ecuador.

"Miners" sort through the garbage looking for recyclables.
“Miners” sort through the garbage looking for recyclables.

Like nearly 300 other recyclers, German Patricio Fernandez gleans his living by picking through the trash at the Zambiza Transfer Station. The station also is known as the Quito Dump, a reference to its days as a full garbage dump. For 23 years, German has been a “miner”, a person who wades into steaming piles of garbage in search of recyclable plastics, metals, cardboard and glass.

While the Dump is safer today as a transfer station, conditions for recyclers remain unsanitary and dangerous. Even worse, their financial outlook is grim. Recyclers sell the materials for pennies per pound. The long hours required to collect and sort the materials help assure that dump workers will remain in extreme poverty.

Historical conditions compound the recyclers’ plight. Many are second- or third-generation miners with little education. They often inherit their parents’ lack of resources, education and hope.

Recyclers once lived in the Dump in tiny shacks.
Recyclers once lived in the Dump in tiny shacks.

Many of the families live in housing that compares with slums worldwide. Prior to the Dump becoming a Transfer Station, families often lived in makeshift housing in and around the Dump. Their tiny homes were constructed with materials found in the trash – scrap wood, cardboard and plastics. These homes were frequently bulldozed as new portions of the Dump were opened, leaving families homeless.

Praying For No Rain

German and his wife, Eva Morocho, had a particularly acute struggle. They have five daughters, a son and grandson. They used to live in a tiny home made of adobe bricks and cardboard. Rain was cause for concern because their house leaked terribly; a thunderstorm would create panic because their dirt floor would turn to mud.

“Before, our life was very sad because we are a nine-person family and we lived in a very small shack,” Eva said. “We all could not fit together and we had to sleep very close to each other. Everything was in the same room, including the kitchen and bedroom.

IMG_0471“Many times water would enter through the roof and from the walls and touch the earth. As parents, we felt horrible seeing our kids in this situation. We wanted to overcome the situation, but we couldn’t because we had to provide for so many kids and could not afford to build a real home.

“We were living in (adobe and) cardboard, in a space about two by two meters,” she added. “All the kids shared a single bunk. We use to have to put pots and pans to catch the water from dripping on our bed.

“At times my wife and I would see each other and begin to cry and say to each other, when will there be a miracle, so that we can have a house for our kids?” German added.

Extreme Conditions Require an Extreme Response

In 2007, the family’s situation began to change. They were invited to hear Jose Jimenez speak at the Dump. Jose and his wife, Teresa, oversee the Quito Family Resource Center and the Child Development Center at the Dump, operated by a humanitarian organization called Extreme Response International. Jose and Teresa strive to encourage the dump worker families by befriending them, helping them meet extreme needs and encouraging them.

Dump Kids.
Prior to ER providing daycare, workers’ kids played in the Dump.

Extreme Response (ER) has been working in the Dump since 1997. Back then ER was comprised of volunteers who saw hungry and dirty kids and simply wanted to provide some nutrition and programming. Fast forward to today. ER now offers childcare, after-school programs, meals, skills training, and medical and dental assistance to the Dump families.

Jose told German and Eva about a program that allows families to qualify to have a home built for them by Extreme Response volunteers. The program is limited to building one or two homes per year. The families must secure land and participate in the construction.

ER’s Paul Fernane, Short-Term Teams Manager – Americas Region, recalled the family’s situation.

“They were living in a very, very small one-room adobe brick house,” Fernane said. “They had a small outdoor cooking grill and an outhouse for their bathroom.”

German and Eva secured land and were selected for the home construction, which was completed in August 2013.

“The family was very excited and immediately indicated they were going to help any way they could to see their dream come true,” Fernane said. “We loved seeing their faces when they saw the first set of house plans.

“The whole family played a part in the pre-work and during the time the work team was in-country. The parents would work during the day with the team and then work in the Dump at night.

SAM_2797“All the kids pitched in, even little Sammy, who was eight at the time. She always wanted to help mix the mortar and carry the full buckets of mortar to the team members. Even when they looked heavier than her, she climbed up ladders, one rung at a time.

“The family members all poured their hearts into helping, and some of their own resources at times. Their smiles and hard work energized the team every day.”

Volunteers from Nebraska, affectionately called “Team Omaha”, came to Quito to build the home. A foundation provided the funds to build the home, while donors outfitted it with furniture, appliances, bedding and groceries.

“The team loved working with this family and was impacted by their commitment to helping,” Fernane said. “The team members were individually challenged to get out of their comfort zones, even if they had never laid a cinder block before or could not speak the language.

SAM_0378“We had women and men, young and old, who had never done this type of work, but they came together with a common goal of pouring into this family in any way they could. They worked hard every day to help make the family’s dream come true.”

While their modest block home was under construction, ER staff and the team realized the family would benefit greatly from extra space and a separate bathroom. So they modified the plans to include a second story and bathroom. The five girls ended up with their own bunk and bathroom suite.

“Having a house completely changed our lives,” German said. “We used to pray to God that he wouldn’t send the rain because we had a SAM_0394dirt floor. Rain was our biggest fear. Today our kids have their own bed and bathroom. There are no words to explain what we have now.

“Now we don’t live like we lived before. We were suffering. It has been a giant change because we can sleep peacefully. We do not live as we used to in a leaky shack. We are content and we give thanks. We live happy.”

“We are very thankful,” Eva said. “Our home is two stories. The five girls are living upstairs. We have our own bathroom and a kitchen. We only dreamed of this. We thought it would take our entire lives to build a home.”

SAM_0564

“This is our room for my sisters and me,” Leslie (daughter) said. I want to give thanks to all of those who helped us build this house. Here in our room each of us has a bed. We like this room because it is big, we have our own privacy and we can play amongst ourselves or do whatever we wish.”

Fernane said the home-building process has changed the family and the work team.

“The family is coming to ER-led programs,” he said. “You can just see that they have a greater sense of hope and their self-esteem is definitely at a higher level. Their lives are being changed in many ways. We believe they have bigger dreams of what their future might look like.”

“The team was impacted by so much during the construction process, but the day the family moved into their dream home deeply touched the hearts of everyone. There were no dry eyes that day.”

SAM_0352
Paul doesn’t miss opportunities to love on the kids.

Watch ER’s new video on building homes for dump families here.

ER and volunteers will build house number 13 this summer for another deserving family of recyclers from the Quito Dump. In addition to construction teams, we host teams that do medical and dental work, kids programs/crafts/sports, and more.

Read about ER’s plans to help rescue more kids out of poverty here. Learn more about volunteer “Extreme Teams”, internships and career opportunities here.

Providing Hope to the Littlest Ones at the Dump

Dump Daycare kids on stepsExtreme Response has worked in the Quito Dump since 1997, starting with a focus helping kids living in extreme poverty. Our commitment to kids has only intensified over the years. Today, ER staff provide strategic programming that allows these kids to catch up to their peers. They do this by supplying nutritious meals and snacks, teaching life skills and using curriculum designed to help the kids advance. Staff also work with Dump parents to raise their engagement in their children’s development.

By Robyn Wallace, Assistant Director, Quito Dump Program

The recyclers grew up sifting through the trash in the Quito Dump alongside their parents to survive. They had no schooling, no protection, no healthcare, little food and even less hope of a different life. The Dump is now a recycling 2garbage transfer station and the young children of the past are the recycling adults of today.

Extreme Response’s Child Development Center within the garbage transfer station offers the first glimpse of hope to the littlest members of our recycling families. Our program,  which began in 2006 with a daycare, serves children age six months old to four years old, who enter the center five days a week and breathe hope.

Hope to eat. Hope to be clean. Hope to be healthy. Hope to learn, grow and be prepared for a lifetime of possibilities.

This past spring, the precious little ones we serve suffered alongside their families in an internal conflict among recycling leadership. Fear, hunger and constant closures challenged the hope we have been sowing. During that chaotic period, ER was able to provide food to our families on three occasions.

Dump Daycare

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Jostin

 

 

 

 

 

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Dump Restrooms for Kids

 

 

 

 

School is back in session! Lesson plans are written, music is playing and building blocks cover the floor once again. We even have the addition of shiny new bathrooms that adorn our center, thanks to a short-term mission team in May. These restrooms will provide extra security and hygiene.

We march on. Hope is waiting.

Want to learn more about helping kids through ER? Read founder Jerry Carnill’s blog on rescuing more kids here, or visit our volunteer page.

Robyn WIMG_5534allace and her husband Brian have been serving in Quito, Ecuador,  since 2014. They work at the Zambiza Garbage Transfer Station, also known as the Quito Dump, where they help care for the nearly 300 families who work as recyclers.  Robyn has been instrumental in identifying curriculum and testing so the kids in the Dump Daycare can enter preschool and kindergarten at levels on par with other kids. Brian oversees the medical and dental clinics, which address families’ physical needs.